Super Hexagon: I love/hate you

Playing Super Hexagon is like having an “It’s Complicated” relationship on Facebook. Imagine this: Your partner is irritating, has bad manners and is constantly critical, but boy does he/she make amazing pancakes. You would like to break up with them but that would mean giving up those pancakes and no one can make pancakes quite like they can.

Read Article →

The Evolution of Sex in Video Games: Walking Erect

While there have been some examples of mature handling of sexual content the majority of treatments we see in the past focus on titillation and are targeted towards a young male audience. Fortunately I think the medium is starting to evolve away from the early examples. In the last three years we are starting to see sexuality enter into the narrative as less of a shock and more of an enhancement to the story and plot.

Read Article →

Redefining Educational Games: Part 1 – Problem Solving

As a sequel of sorts to my post last year, A Parents Guide to Video Games, I am starting a new series. In these articles I hope to show that more learning occurs through traditional video games than those that are labeled “educational”.

Educational games tend to miss the mark. The game part of educational games seem to take a backseat to the learning. I think a lot of parents see their child’s devotion and draw to video games and become a little nervous at the intensity and effort that is displayed. There is often more energy expended on games than a lot of other things in their lives. A very normal reaction to this is “It’s fine if you want to play a game as long as it is an educational one.” The problem here is that the experience is no where near as compelling with an educational game as it is with a traditional video game.

Read Article →

Saving the video game industry and the Nintendo Wii

The Nintendo Wii is a beautiful thing. It arrived at a time when the other gaming consoles were fighting a war for supreme mediocrity. In the front lines were rehashes of first person shooters that looked like high definition DOOM, tired licenses where the producers forgot why we loved the original in the first place and movie titles that were positioned to catch sixty dollars from parents of nine year olds looking to re-experience the magic of a day at the cinema.

Read Article →